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Domed NFL Stadiums: Best NFL Stadium With Domes

Written by: Richard Janvrin
Published September 5, 2023
13 min read

Whether it’s to protect teams from the elements or simply for aesthetics, a handful of NFL stadiums around the league are equipped with a complete or retractable dome. Below, we’ll look at each stadium, view their capacity, and see which teams have the upper hand in limiting weather during their home games. 

NFL Stadium With Domes

StadiumCapacityTeam(s)Dome

AT&T Stadium

80,000

Dallas Cowboys

Retractable

Caesars Superdome

73,208

New Orleans Saints

Complete

NRG Stadium

72,220

Houston Texans

Retractable

Mercedes-Benz Stadium

71,000

Atlanta Falcons

Retractable

SoFi Stadium

70,000

Los Angeles Chargers and Rams

Complete

Lucas Oil Stadium

67,000

Indianapolis Colts

Retractable

U.S. Bank Stadium

66,655

Minnesota Vikings

Complete

Allegiant Stadium

65,000

Las Vegas Raiders

Complete

Ford Field

65,000

Detroit Lions

Complete

State Farm Stadium

63,400

Arizona Cardinals

Retractable

NFL Domed Stadiums

Information About Each Stadium

AT&T Stadium

AT&T Stadium is the largest stadium in the NFL with a dome. Also known as Jerry World can accommodate up to 100,000 people for special events and features the largest high-definition screen hanging above the field. 

Caesars Superdome

Now known as the Caesars Superdome, this is a complete dome that opened in August 1975. The most people to ever be inside the stadium was Wrestlemania 34, with 78,133 attendees. 

NRG Stadium

Home of the expansion franchise Houston Texans, this stadium opened on August 24, 2002. It cost $350 million to build and has even been the site for rodeos in Texas. 

Mercedes-Benz Stadium

One of the newer stadiums on the list, Mercedes-Benz Stadium, opened on August 26, 2017, and cost about $1.7 billion to build. It had a record-high attendance during the 2022 Peach Bowl on December 31, 2022, with more than 79,300 people. 

SoFi Stadium

NFL Stadiums SoFi Stadium

Opening on September 8, 2020, SoFi Stadium is shared by the Los Angeles Chargers and Rams. Including development costs, it ran a bill of about $5+ billion. It will be used during the 2026 World Cup and can hold up to 100,000 people for special events. 

Lucas Oil Stadium

Home of the Indianapolis Colts, this stadium opened during the Peyton Manning years on August 16, 2008, after breaking ground in 2005. It cost about $720 million to build, which was a high mark for that period, especially considering the circumstances of the United States economy. It has several annual events, such as the NFL Scouting Combine. 

U.S. Bank Stadium

After years of suffering through the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome, the Vikings got U.S. Bank Field, which opened on July 22, 2016. It cost more than $1 billion to build. 

Allegiant Stadium

Another one of the newer stadiums in the NFL, Allegiant Stadium, is where the Las Vegas Raiders play. The stadium cost more than $1.9 billion to build and is owned by AEG Facilities. As of September 2023, it’s the second-most expensive stadium in the world. 

Ford Field

Ford Field opened in August 2002 and cost an eye-popping $500 million to build. Following a renovation in 2017 that cost about another $100 million, it can now house up to 80,000 people for basketball games. 

State Farm Stadium

NFL Stadiums State Farm Stadium

Known as “The Big Toaster,” State Farm Arena is the smallest stadium on the list, and it cost $455 million to build when it opened on August 1, 2006. The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority owns it and underwent renovations in 2014 and 2017. It’ll be the site of the NCAA Final Four in 2024. 

Known as “The Big Toaster,” State Farm Arena is the smallest stadium on the list, and it cost $455 million to build when it opened on August 1, 2006. The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority owns it and underwent renovations in 2014 and 2017. It’ll be the site of the NCAA Final Four in 2024. 

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AUTHOR

Richard Janvrin

560 Articles

After graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a BA in Journalism, Richard Janvrin has been covering iGaming and sports betting since December 2018. Richard has covered betting at Bleacher Report, Gambling.com, The Game Day, Forbes, and more.

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