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Biggest NFL Stadiums: NFL Stadiums Ranked by Capacity

Written by: Richard Janvrin
Published September 4, 2023
17 min read

With 32 teams in the NFL, we need places for these teams to play. Across the league, there are 30 stadiums. The New York Giants and Jets share MetLife Stadium, while the Los Angeles Rams and Chargers share SoFi Stadium.

Below, we’ll review each NFL stadium and rank them by capacity, followed by some information on each.

Biggest NFL Stadiums

StadiumCapacityTeam(s

MetLife Stadium

82,500

New York Giants & Jets

Lambeau Field

81,441

Green Bay Packers

AT&T Stadium

80,000

Dallas Cowboys

Arrowhead Stadium

76,416

Kansas City Chiefs

Empower Field at Mile High

76,125

Denver Broncos

Bank of America Stadium

75,523

Carolina Panthers

Caesars Superdome

73,208

New Orleans Saints

NRG Stadium

72,220

Houston Texans

Highmark Stadium

71,608

Buffalo Bills

M&T Bank Stadium

71,008

Baltimore Ravens

Mercedes-Benz Stadium

71,000

Atlanta Falcons

SoFi Stadium

70,000

Los Angeles Chargers and Rams

Lincoln Financial Field

69,596

Philadelphia Eagles

Nissan Stadium

69,143

Tennessee Titans

TIAA Bank Field

69,132

Jacksonville Jaguars

Lumen Field

69,000

Seattle Seahawks

Levi's Stadium

68,500

San Francisco 49ers

Acrisure Stadium

68,400

Pittsburgh Steelers

FirstEnergy Stadium

67,895

Cleveland Browns

FedExField

67,717

Washington Commanders

Lucas Oil Stadium

67,000

Indianapolis Colts

Gillette Stadium

66,829

New England Patriots

U.S. Bank Stadium

66,655

Minnesota Vikings

Raymond James Stadium

65,890

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Paycor Stadium

65,515

Cincinnati Bengals

Hard Rock Stadium

65,326

Miami Dolphins

Allegiant Stadium

65,000

Las Vegas Raiders

Ford Field

65,000

Detroit Lions

State Farm Stadium

63,400

Arizona Cardinals

Soldier Field

61,500

Chicago Bears 

NFL Biggest Stadiums

Information About Each Stadium

MetLife Stadium

Opening in 2010, MetLife Stadium cost about $1.6 billion to build and was the most expensive stadium at the time. It has dual-colored seating and is one of two stadiums shared by teams. 

Lambeau Field

Lambeau Field opened in 1957 and has natural grass. At Packers games, there’s a celebration known as the Lambeau Leap, which involves the player who scored the touchdown jumping into the stands to celebrate with fans. A person or group doesn’t own the Packers. Instead, the team is owned by its fans through a non-profit organization. 

AT&T Stadium

Also known as “Jerry World” due to owner Jerry Jones, AT&T Stadium may rank third on the list, but accommodations can be made to support more than 100,000 for special events. It’s known for its giant high-definition video screen above the field. 

Arrowhead Stadium

Opening in 1972, the Kansas City Chiefs have called Arrowhead Stadium home ever since. There have been multiple renovations throughout the years. In 2013, it broke the record for the loudest stadium at 137.5 decibels. It was broken shortly after, but it illustrates the passionate fan base. 

Empower Field at Mile High

NFL Stadiums Empower Field at Mile High

Located in Denver, Colorado, Mile High is the name of the stadium due to the city’s elevation of 1 mile above sea level. We commonly see this manifest in games, especially for opponents having trouble acclimating. It opened in 2001 and cost more than $400 million. 

Bank of America Stadium

Opening in 1996, Bank of America Stadium has undergone several expansions and renovations after being built for $248 million. It’s also the site for the ACC Championship for college football through 2030. 

Caesars Superdome

Known as the Louisiana Superdome between 1975 and 2011, it was renamed the Mercedez-Benz Super Dome from 2011 to 2021. Today, it’s Caesars Superdome. The record attendance for this stadium wasn’t a football game—it was Wrestlemania 34 in 2018. 

NRG Stadium

Equipped with a retractable roof, NRG Stadium opened on August 24, 2022, as the home of the Texans, an expansion franchise. It cost $350 million to build and has been home to NFL games, college football games, and even rodeos. In 2026, it’ll host matches during the World Cup. 

Highmark Stadium

The current Highmark Stadium is set to be replaced as the home for the Bills in time for the 2026 season, as the current one opened in August 1973. The original cost to build it was a mere $22 million, which, by today’s standards, is still low at $145 million. 

M&T Bank Stadium

Located across the street from Camden Yards, where the Baltimore Orioles play, M&T Bank Stadium opened on September 6, 1998, for the Ravens, who were technically the Cleveland Browns before leaving the city in the mid-1990s. It cost $220 million to build and is equipped with natural grass. 

Mercedes-Benz Stadium

Mercedes-Benz used to have the naming rights to the Saints’ home field, but now it does for the Atlanta Falcons stadium, which was minted on August 26, 2017. One of the newer stadiums cost $1.6 billion to build. Its record-high attendance was at the Peach Bowl in 2022 at over 79,300. 

SoFi Stadium

Another new stadium, SoFi Stadium, became the second stadium home to two NFL teams on September 8, 2020. It costs somewhere in the realm of $5-$6 billion to build, which includes development. It can hold over 100,000 people for certain major events and will be used during the 2026 World Cup. 

Lincoln Financial Field

NFL Stadiums Lincoln Financial Field

Opening on August 3, 2023, this Bermuda grass-surfaced stadium can be easily seen from I-95. It replaced Veterans Stadium, which opened in 1971. The Eagles, the MLB team, and the Philadelphia Phillies shared that stadium. It has more than 624 feet of LED ribbon boards inside Lincoln Financial Field. 

Nissan Stadium

Home of the Tennessee Titans, Nissan Stadium is owned by the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County. It opened in August 1999 and cost $290 to build. It’s used for Nashville SC in the MLS and is also home to the CMA Music Festival each June. 

TIAA Bank Field

Previously known as EverBank Field, TIAA Bank Field has had four names since opening in August 1995. The Jaguars were an expansion franchise. It’s undergone a few renovations and cost $121 million to build. It was temporarily home to the New Orleans Saints due to Hurricane Ida. 

Lumen Field

Over the years, the volume of fans inside Lumen Field has broken records, clocking in at 137.6 decibels in 2014. It was home to the Seattle Sea Dragons of the XFL in 2023 and will be a site for the 2026 World Cup. 

Levi’s Stadium

Opening in July 2014, Levi’s Stadium has also been home to a Wrestlemania event, seeing a record attendance of nearly 77,000. It cost $1.3 billion to build and is owned by the Santa Clara Stadium Authority. It will host Super Bowl LX and World Cup games in 2026. 

Acrisure Stadium

Overtaking the legendary Heinz Field namesake, this stadium initially opened in August 2001 for $281 million. It was renovated in 2007 and expanded in 2015. It had a record attendance of 73,117 on June 17, 2023, when Taylor Swift took the stage. 

FirstEnergy Stadium

Opening on September 12, 1999, FirstEnergy Stadium had a record attendance in a game against the Steelers in 2002, where the attendance was north of 73,000. This is less than the capacity available now after a renovation project. 

FedExField

Opening in 1997, FedExField’s days might be numbered as the Washington Commanders have a new ownership group led by Josh Harris. It cost $251 million to build, and Harris owns the stadium. Between 2004 and 2010, it had the largest capacity for an NFL stadium at 91,000 but was reduced massively. 

Lucas Oil Stadium

Opened during the glory days of Peyton Manning as their quarterback, Lucas Oil Stadium broke ground in 2005 and opened on August 16, 2008. It cost $720 million to build and is owned by Indiana Stadium and Convention Building Authority. 

Gillette Stadium

NFL Stadiums Gillette Stadium

Owned by the Kraft Group, Gillette Stadium opened on May 11, 2002, and has FieldTurf for its surface. Outside the stadium is a shopping center called “Patriot Place.” It cost $325 million to build. 

U.S. Bank Stadium

Another one of the newer stadiums in the NFL, U.S. Bank Stadium, opened on July 22, 2016. It famously came just after the former Vikings stadium, the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome roof, caved in due to snow. It cost more than $1 billion to build. 

Raymond James Stadium

Opening on September 20, 1998, Raymond James Stadium has a pirate ship that acts as a gameday attraction. It cost $168.5 million to build and had a record attendance of 74,512 for the 2017 College Football National Championship game. Tampa Sports Authority owns it. 

Paycor Stadium

Previously known as Paul Brown Stadium, since its inception on August 19, 2000, the naming rights were awarded to Paycor before the 2022 season. The record attendance came on September 29, 2022, on a Thursday Night Football game between the Bengals and Dolphins. Hamilton County owns it. 

Hard Rock Stadium

Also home to the Miami Hurricanes college football team, Hard Rock Stadium opened in August 1987 for $115 million. It’s owned by Stephen Ross, who also owns the team. It’ll host numerous matches during the 2026 World Cup. 

Allegiant Stadium

Another one of the newest stadiums in the league, Allegiant Stadium, cost $1.9 billion to build and is owned by AEG Facilities. It can be expanded to accommodate 71,835 people for specific events. It’s currently the second-most expensive stadium in the world. 

Ford Field

Opening on August 24, 2002, Ford Field cost $500 million to build, which was massive. It can be expanded to 80,000 capacity for basketball games after renovation in 2017. The record attendance came on April 1, 2007, for Wrestlemania with 80,103 people. 

State Farm Stadium

Costing $455 million to build, State Farm Stadium opened on August 1, 2006, and underwent renovations in 2014 and 2017. It’s owned by Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority and will host the NCAA Final Four in 2024. 

Soldier Field

NFL Stadiums Soldier Field

The smallest stadium in the NFL is also the oldest. Soldier Field has an incredible history, opening on October 9, 1924. Not this season, but it’ll officially be 100 years old next season. It closed for renovations from January 19, 2002, to September 26, 2003. It cost $13 million to build in 1924. The Chicago Park District owns it. 

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AUTHOR

Richard Janvrin

550 Articles

After graduating from the University of New Hampshire with a BA in Journalism, Richard Janvrin has been covering iGaming and sports betting since December 2018. Richard has covered betting at Bleacher Report, Gambling.com, The Game Day, Forbes, and more.

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